NEW YORK (AP) – The former president’s top allies Donald Trump are creating a new super PAC that is expected to be his main spending vehicle in the midterms and could become a key part of his campaign infrastructure if he makes a run for the White House in 2024.

The political action committee, called MAGA Inc., will replace Trump’s existing super PAC, Politico reported. Preparation of documents for the new commission was filed Friday morning with the Federal Election Commission.

The buildup comes at a time when Trump, a Republican, is under threat increasing legal pressure on various fronts. The Ministry of Justice opened a criminal case on the fact that hundreds documents with a seal of secrecy ended up at his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Fla., and state and federal officials are scrutinizing his efforts to cancel he lost the 2020 election to Democrat Joe Biden. And in New York, Attorney General Letitia James sued this week, alleging that Trump’s namesake campaign engaged in decades of accounting fraud, increasing his fortune by billions of dollars and routinely misleading banks.

News of the new super PAC also broke less than two months ago midterm election on November 8 and just as many Republican candidates were trying to raise money against well-funded Democrats.

“President Trump is committed to saving America, and Make America Great Again, Inc. will ensure that this is achieved at the ballot box in November and beyond,” said Trump spokesman Taylor Budovich, who will serve as the group’s executive director.

Others on the committee include Republican strategist Chris LaCivita, longtime Trump analyst Tony Fabrizio and communications aides Steven Cheng and Alex Pfeiffer.

So far, Trump’s Save America PAC, which must adhere to much tighter limits on fundraising and spending, and come under your own control, served as his main political tool. Super PACs can raise unlimited money and spend it freely, but they are prohibited from directly coordinating with campaigns.

Trump officials declined to say how much the notoriously thrifty former president plans to spend on his midterm efforts or how much he might try to transfer from his Save America PAC, which ended in August with more than $90 million. The Associated Press previously reported that aides had discussed moving at least some of that money to a new or repurposed super PAC, though campaign finance experts are ambivalent about the legality of such a move.

While Trump is busy fundraising leaving office, vacuuming small donations, his existing super PAC — Make America Great Again, Again! — was not a major mid-level player.

Pressure is mounting on Trump to open his war chest and start spending money in the midterm race as Republicans have been outnumbered by Democrats heading into the final campaign.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, in particular, urged candidates who support Trump to ask him to open his wallet. Meanwhile, candidates, including some who presented themselves as McConnell’s antagonists during the primaries, have had to side with him and the Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC he oversees that had $100 million in reserves as of late June.

Trump played a highly visible role during the GOP primaries, endorsing hundreds of candidates up and down the ballot, from Senate to governor to county commissioner. But some of those challengers are now fighting their own general elections, wresting control of the evenly divided Senate.

Trump is expected to launch another presidential run, but the timing of the announcement remains unclear. While he was once eager to announce before the midterm elections, in part to try to avoid the long list of potential challengers that have been swirling, some aides have urged him to wait, warning that an early announcement could cost him if Republicans do poorly in November.


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